Post of the Week: “Parenting without gender expectations means accepting all outcomes”

Once again, it’s time to highlighting a post from an independent parenting blogger that has caught my eye. This week, it’s “Parenting without gender expectations means accepting all outcomes,” from Aly Windsor, who is parenting two kids with her partner and just started blogging at Embrace Release.

Aly writes, “Every day I realize more and more how much of what I do as a parent is experimental. What worked yesterday might not work today or next week. I’ve got my guiding principles but otherwise it’s all improv, and sometimes, oftentimes, a whole lot of flailing.”

I’ve been there. I think most of us have.

She goes on to describe how she and her partner are trying to raise their kids with “as few gender limits as possible”—but how kids will nevertheless find their own, sometimes unexpected, paths.

Aly is a brand-new blogger, so pop on over and offer her some encouragement. (Her other post, on How I Learned to Stop Being Angry at my Sister for Being Anti-gay, is worth a read, too.)

When Aly submitted her post for consideration, she mentioned that she thought she wouldn’t stand a chance against “senior bloggers”—so I wanted to clarify that this feature isn’t about seniority (if there even is such a thing) or time on the Internet. In fact, my tendency is to stay away from featuring blogs that everyone is reading anyway, since, well, you’re already reading them. No need for me to tell you to go do so. I’d rather highlight the newer and/or less-trafficked blogs that you might want to consider adding to your reading list. (Not that I won’t make the occasional exception.)

Once again, if you come across any posts that you’d like to recommend (your own or someone else’s), leave a comment or send me an e-mail. I expect the picks will weigh towards LGBT parenting blogs (including blogs of people with LGBT parents and parents of LGBT kids), but I’m happy to consider posts from non-LGBT blogs as well, especially if they reflect on commonalities of our parenting experience.